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PostPosted: 13 Jan 2016, 19:06 
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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 06:34 
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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 06:35 
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Complete list of nominees.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 06:44 
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I think The Revenant is a dude flick. I saw it, and although it was good, it wasn't that good. I gotta watch Spotlight and a few others before the Oscars!


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 06:55 
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I'm surprised Sicario didn't get more love. It's the type of film you picture as a nominee, plus no noms for Del Toro or Blunt.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 06:58 
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sldawgs wrote:
I'm surprised Sicario didn't get more love. It's the type of film you picture as a nominee, plus no noms for Del Toro or Blunt.

Saw this a few days ago. Blunt and Del Toro were awesome

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 07:03 
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Dawson wrote:
sldawgs wrote:
I'm surprised Sicario didn't get more love. It's the type of film you picture as a nominee, plus no noms for Del Toro or Blunt.

Saw this a few days ago. Blunt and Del Toro were awesome

:green:


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 11:00 
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Kick ass, I believe I'm set to discuss all of this (besides Foreign Film and Documentary, of course -- a little pissed about that; I saw a dozen of each last year easy and Amy is the only I managed to catch on both lists).

Let's start here: Mad Max and Brooklyn zoom to the top of the overrated list. I liked both films, but ... seriously? Best picture worthy? 10 nominations for Mad Max ?! Did we see the same film? Mine was a lot like Road Warrior, only not nearly as good. At least Max had some good controversy. Brooklyn is a kid gloves film, made by people who can't stand it when there's hurt feelings.

Not wild about the love for Room, either. Was the kind of film that makes your stomach hurt. Direction was Oscar-worthy for about the first 30 minutes. After that? Ummmm, no. Don't have any problem with Brie Larson's nom.

Voters were right to snub Joy.

Alicia Vikander deserved two nods -- one for Danish Girl and another for Ex Machina. I'd gladly have dumped either Rooney Mara or Rachel McAdams to accommodate. McAdams is only there because we liked Spotlight anyway.

I loved 100-Year-Old Man ... but there's nothing you could reasonably nominate it for besides Make-up.

Will Smith deserved a nod for Concussion. I would have grudgingly shoved out either Matt Damon or Eddie Redmayne for that one. Redmayne got the nod for playing a convincing woman, but his Danish Girl is very one-dimensional.

Don't have any problem with Revenant love.

Overjoyed to see the Academy ignore Good Dinosaur.


That's all I got for now.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 13:16 
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I haven't seen the big short, spotlight or Creed yet. Seeing Creed tomorrow but I'm already reading about the backlash on the lack of diversity. Of course no one moaning about Del Toro but he isn't the popular minority I guess.

I love the mad max nod. I think it's just saying that you don't have to make an 'Oscar movie' (cough cough Eddie redmayne) to get the nod. And I loved Mad Max.

Alicia Vikander is great though and I'm glad she's getting recognition. Also kinda happy Black Mass was left out as I didn't get the hype at all.

Would have liked Walton Goggins to have been noticed though.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 15:23 
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Don't forget AMC's Best Picture Showcase! Schedules haven't been set yet, but it's a great and economical way to see all 8 (or 4 if you do only 1 day).

PS: I'm in no way an employee of, or related to AMC Theaters or their subsidiaries. :D

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 16:16 
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imo Jennifer Lawrence is becoming one of the most overrated actresses these days. Joy was so mediocre.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 16:25 
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NoShoes wrote:
Don't forget AMC's Best Picture Showcase! Schedules haven't been set yet, but it's a great and economical way to see all 8 (or 4 if you do only 1 day).

PS: I'm in no way an employee of, or related to AMC Theaters or their subsidiaries. :D

Sure, sure, sure.


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 16:26 
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Bill wrote:
imo Jennifer Lawrence is becoming one of the most overrated actresses these days. Joy was so mediocre.

Yeah, but she's so much on the red carpet, stage stairs, podium :mishchief:

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 16:29 
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NoShoes wrote:
Don't forget AMC's Best Picture Showcase!

Hmmm, never thought of that. Recently the Academy has not nominated the maximum 10 movies, and the last couple of years has been 8. Wonder if AMC has anything to do with that? 4 movies a day would be easier on the theater than 5.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2016, 17:59 
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sldawgs wrote:
NoShoes wrote:
Don't forget AMC's Best Picture Showcase!

Hmmm, never thought of that. Recently the Academy has not nominated the maximum 10 movies, and the last couple of years has been 8. Wonder if AMC has anything to do with that? 4 movies a day would be easier on the theater than 5.

I know last year, a very small number of theaters in major markets (NYC, etc) did a 1-day event with all 8 films. I'll always remember on day 2 it started snowing and by the start of the 4th film (American Sniper) my wife was calling saying I should leave. Really wanted to see the film so I stayed and drove home in very dangerous conditions, white-knuckling it all the way home. And if I do forget, my wife will remind me :tongue:

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PostPosted: 20 Jan 2016, 07:46 
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FWIW, the FrogBlog reviews of the Best Pic nominations:

The Big Short

Bridge of Spies

Brooklyn

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Room

Spotlight


And personally, how I'd rank them:

Spoiler
The Martian
The Big Short
The Revenant


Spotlight


Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
Room




Brooklyn

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PostPosted: 20 Jan 2016, 08:18 
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Purchased tickets for 2-day event 2/20 & 2/27. Two films will be repeats for me by then :banana:

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PostPosted: 20 Jan 2016, 08:52 
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NoShoes wrote:
Purchased tickets for 2-day event 2/20 & 2/27. Two films will be repeats for me by then :banana:

:green: :green:

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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2016, 06:32 
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spymeg wrote:
knarf wrote:
Dawson wrote:
Don't people realise the oscars aren't at fault, it's the fact that there weren't enough decent roles for minority actors.

I agree, but I also saw some statistics about the Academy I didn't know before: 94% white, with a median age of 62*.

Since they select the nominees, there's definitely the potential for bias to have an impact. At the very least it can effect the movies they decide to watch/possibly nominate.



* also 77% male, but that's another issue.

But the Academy doesn't nominate, right? Most categories are nominated by the members of the corresponding branch–actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. Then the members vote on those noms? And the Academy members are all people in the business..actors, writers, etc. ?

Okay according to Mental Floss, this is the way the Academy selects Oscar nominees.
Quote:
THE FORMULA FOR GETTING NOMINATED

The Academy has strict rules that determine what people or films can be nominated. In order to submit a film for nomination, a movie's producer or distributor must sign and submit an “Official Screen Credits” in early December. That's not just a full list of credits; you need proof that the film meets certain criteria: In order to be eligible, the film must be over 40 minutes in length; must be publicly screened for paid admission in Los Angeles County (with the name of a particular theater where it screened included); and must screen for a qualifying run of at least seven straight days. In addition, the film cannot have its premiere outside of a theatrical run—screening a film for the first time on television or the Internet, for example, renders the film ineligible.

Then, the ballots are sent out. According to Entertainment Weekly, "Voters are asked to list up to five names, ranked in order of preference. The Academy instructs voters to 'follow their hearts' because the voting process doesn’t penalize for picking eccentric choices ... Also, listing the same person or film twice doesn’t help their cause—in fact, it actually diminishes the chance that the voter’s ballot will be counted at all."

Once members send back their ballots, PricewaterhouseCoopers begins the process of crunching the numbers. Specifically, they're looking for the magic number, the amount of votes in each category that automatically turns a potential nominee into an official nominee. To determine the magic number, PwC takes the total number of ballots received for a particular category and divides it by the total possible nominees plus one. An easy example is to take 600 potential ballots for the Best Actor category, divide that by 6 (five possible nominees plus one), thus making the magic number for the category 100 ballots to become an official nominee.

The counting—which is still done by hand—starts based on a voter’s first choice selection until someone reaches the magic number. Say Leonardo DiCaprio reaches the magic number first for his performance in The Revenant: the ballots that named him as a first choice are then all set aside, and there are now four spots left for the Best Actor category. The actor with the fewest first-place votes is automatically knocked out, and those ballots are redistributed based on the voters' second place choices (though the actors still in the running retain their calculated votes from the first round). The counting continues, and actors or different categories rack up redistributed votes until all five spots are filled. According to Entertainment Weekly, "if a ballot runs out of selections, that ballot is voided and is no longer in play, which is why it’s important for voters to list five different nominees." (The magic number drops as ballots are voided, by the way.) The process is ballooned for the Best Picture category, which can have up to 10 nominees and no less than five.

Deciding the winners is much simpler: After the nominees are decided, the whole Academy gets to vote on each category. Each member gets one vote per category—though they're discouraged from voting in categories they don't fully understand or categories in which they haven't seen all the nominated films—and the film or actor with the most votes wins. That process takes PwC just three days.

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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2016, 08:48 
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sldawgs wrote:
[Moved from the Pissed Off thread]
spymeg wrote:
knarf wrote:
Dawson wrote:
Don't people realise the oscars aren't at fault, it's the fact that there weren't enough decent roles for minority actors.

I agree, but I also saw some statistics about the Academy I didn't know before: 94% white, with a median age of 62*.

Since they select the nominees, there's definitely the potential for bias to have an impact. At the very least it can effect the movies they decide to watch/possibly nominate.



* also 77% male, but that's another issue.

But the Academy doesn't nominate, right? Most categories are nominated by the members of the corresponding branch–actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. Then the members vote on those noms? And the Academy members are all people in the business..actors, writers, etc. ?

Okay according to Mental Floss, this is the way the Academy selects Oscar nominees.
Quote:
THE FORMULA FOR GETTING NOMINATED

The Academy has strict rules that determine what people or films can be nominated. In order to submit a film for nomination, a movie's producer or distributor must sign and submit an “Official Screen Credits” in early December. That's not just a full list of credits; you need proof that the film meets certain criteria: In order to be eligible, the film must be over 40 minutes in length; must be publicly screened for paid admission in Los Angeles County (with the name of a particular theater where it screened included); and must screen for a qualifying run of at least seven straight days. In addition, the film cannot have its premiere outside of a theatrical run—screening a film for the first time on television or the Internet, for example, renders the film ineligible.

Then, the ballots are sent out. According to Entertainment Weekly, "Voters are asked to list up to five names, ranked in order of preference. The Academy instructs voters to 'follow their hearts' because the voting process doesn’t penalize for picking eccentric choices ... Also, listing the same person or film twice doesn’t help their cause—in fact, it actually diminishes the chance that the voter’s ballot will be counted at all."

Once members send back their ballots, PricewaterhouseCoopers begins the process of crunching the numbers. Specifically, they're looking for the magic number, the amount of votes in each category that automatically turns a potential nominee into an official nominee. To determine the magic number, PwC takes the total number of ballots received for a particular category and divides it by the total possible nominees plus one. An easy example is to take 600 potential ballots for the Best Actor category, divide that by 6 (five possible nominees plus one), thus making the magic number for the category 100 ballots to become an official nominee.

The counting—which is still done by hand—starts based on a voter’s first choice selection until someone reaches the magic number. Say Leonardo DiCaprio reaches the magic number first for his performance in The Revenant: the ballots that named him as a first choice are then all set aside, and there are now four spots left for the Best Actor category. The actor with the fewest first-place votes is automatically knocked out, and those ballots are redistributed based on the voters' second place choices (though the actors still in the running retain their calculated votes from the first round). The counting continues, and actors or different categories rack up redistributed votes until all five spots are filled. According to Entertainment Weekly, "if a ballot runs out of selections, that ballot is voided and is no longer in play, which is why it’s important for voters to list five different nominees." (The magic number drops as ballots are voided, by the way.) The process is ballooned for the Best Picture category, which can have up to 10 nominees and no less than five.

Deciding the winners is much simpler: After the nominees are decided, the whole Academy gets to vote on each category. Each member gets one vote per category—though they're discouraged from voting in categories they don't fully understand or categories in which they haven't seen all the nominated films—and the film or actor with the most votes wins. That process takes PwC just three days.

So how is PwC being mostly white, older men affecting this process? I'm just a little slow. :D


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2016, 09:00 
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spymeg wrote:
sldawgs wrote:
[Moved from the Pissed Off thread]
spymeg wrote:
knarf wrote:
Dawson wrote:
Don't people realise the oscars aren't at fault, it's the fact that there weren't enough decent roles for minority actors.

I agree, but I also saw some statistics about the Academy I didn't know before: 94% white, with a median age of 62*.

Since they select the nominees, there's definitely the potential for bias to have an impact. At the very least it can effect the movies they decide to watch/possibly nominate.



* also 77% male, but that's another issue.

But the Academy doesn't nominate, right? Most categories are nominated by the members of the corresponding branch–actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. Then the members vote on those noms? And the Academy members are all people in the business..actors, writers, etc. ?

Okay according to Mental Floss, this is the way the Academy selects Oscar nominees.
Quote:
THE FORMULA FOR GETTING NOMINATED

The Academy has strict rules that determine what people or films can be nominated. In order to submit a film for nomination, a movie's producer or distributor must sign and submit an “Official Screen Credits” in early December. That's not just a full list of credits; you need proof that the film meets certain criteria: In order to be eligible, the film must be over 40 minutes in length; must be publicly screened for paid admission in Los Angeles County (with the name of a particular theater where it screened included); and must screen for a qualifying run of at least seven straight days. In addition, the film cannot have its premiere outside of a theatrical run—screening a film for the first time on television or the Internet, for example, renders the film ineligible.

Then, the ballots are sent out. According to Entertainment Weekly, "Voters are asked to list up to five names, ranked in order of preference. The Academy instructs voters to 'follow their hearts' because the voting process doesn’t penalize for picking eccentric choices ... Also, listing the same person or film twice doesn’t help their cause—in fact, it actually diminishes the chance that the voter’s ballot will be counted at all."

Once members send back their ballots, PricewaterhouseCoopers begins the process of crunching the numbers. Specifically, they're looking for the magic number, the amount of votes in each category that automatically turns a potential nominee into an official nominee. To determine the magic number, PwC takes the total number of ballots received for a particular category and divides it by the total possible nominees plus one. An easy example is to take 600 potential ballots for the Best Actor category, divide that by 6 (five possible nominees plus one), thus making the magic number for the category 100 ballots to become an official nominee.

The counting—which is still done by hand—starts based on a voter’s first choice selection until someone reaches the magic number. Say Leonardo DiCaprio reaches the magic number first for his performance in The Revenant: the ballots that named him as a first choice are then all set aside, and there are now four spots left for the Best Actor category. The actor with the fewest first-place votes is automatically knocked out, and those ballots are redistributed based on the voters' second place choices (though the actors still in the running retain their calculated votes from the first round). The counting continues, and actors or different categories rack up redistributed votes until all five spots are filled. According to Entertainment Weekly, "if a ballot runs out of selections, that ballot is voided and is no longer in play, which is why it’s important for voters to list five different nominees." (The magic number drops as ballots are voided, by the way.) The process is ballooned for the Best Picture category, which can have up to 10 nominees and no less than five.

Deciding the winners is much simpler: After the nominees are decided, the whole Academy gets to vote on each category. Each member gets one vote per category—though they're discouraged from voting in categories they don't fully understand or categories in which they haven't seen all the nominated films—and the film or actor with the most votes wins. That process takes PwC just three days.

So how is PwC being mostly white, older men affecting this process? I'm just a little slow. :D

Because, you know, math and stuff.

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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2016, 09:07 
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spymeg wrote:
sldawgs wrote:
[Moved from the Pissed Off thread]
spymeg wrote:
knarf wrote:
Dawson wrote:
Don't people realise the oscars aren't at fault, it's the fact that there weren't enough decent roles for minority actors.

I agree, but I also saw some statistics about the Academy I didn't know before: 94% white, with a median age of 62*.

Since they select the nominees, there's definitely the potential for bias to have an impact. At the very least it can effect the movies they decide to watch/possibly nominate.



* also 77% male, but that's another issue.

But the Academy doesn't nominate, right? Most categories are nominated by the members of the corresponding branch–actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. Then the members vote on those noms? And the Academy members are all people in the business..actors, writers, etc. ?

Okay according to Mental Floss, this is the way the Academy selects Oscar nominees.
Quote:
THE FORMULA FOR GETTING NOMINATED

The Academy has strict rules that determine what people or films can be nominated. In order to submit a film for nomination, a movie's producer or distributor must sign and submit an “Official Screen Credits” in early December. That's not just a full list of credits; you need proof that the film meets certain criteria: In order to be eligible, the film must be over 40 minutes in length; must be publicly screened for paid admission in Los Angeles County (with the name of a particular theater where it screened included); and must screen for a qualifying run of at least seven straight days. In addition, the film cannot have its premiere outside of a theatrical run—screening a film for the first time on television or the Internet, for example, renders the film ineligible.

Then, the ballots are sent out. According to Entertainment Weekly, "Voters are asked to list up to five names, ranked in order of preference. The Academy instructs voters to 'follow their hearts' because the voting process doesn’t penalize for picking eccentric choices ... Also, listing the same person or film twice doesn’t help their cause—in fact, it actually diminishes the chance that the voter’s ballot will be counted at all."

Once members send back their ballots, PricewaterhouseCoopers begins the process of crunching the numbers. Specifically, they're looking for the magic number, the amount of votes in each category that automatically turns a potential nominee into an official nominee. To determine the magic number, PwC takes the total number of ballots received for a particular category and divides it by the total possible nominees plus one. An easy example is to take 600 potential ballots for the Best Actor category, divide that by 6 (five possible nominees plus one), thus making the magic number for the category 100 ballots to become an official nominee.

The counting—which is still done by hand—starts based on a voter’s first choice selection until someone reaches the magic number. Say Leonardo DiCaprio reaches the magic number first for his performance in The Revenant: the ballots that named him as a first choice are then all set aside, and there are now four spots left for the Best Actor category. The actor with the fewest first-place votes is automatically knocked out, and those ballots are redistributed based on the voters' second place choices (though the actors still in the running retain their calculated votes from the first round). The counting continues, and actors or different categories rack up redistributed votes until all five spots are filled. According to Entertainment Weekly, "if a ballot runs out of selections, that ballot is voided and is no longer in play, which is why it’s important for voters to list five different nominees." (The magic number drops as ballots are voided, by the way.) The process is ballooned for the Best Picture category, which can have up to 10 nominees and no less than five.

Deciding the winners is much simpler: After the nominees are decided, the whole Academy gets to vote on each category. Each member gets one vote per category—though they're discouraged from voting in categories they don't fully understand or categories in which they haven't seen all the nominated films—and the film or actor with the most votes wins. That process takes PwC just three days.

So how is PwC being mostly white, older men affecting this process? I'm just a little slow. :D

wd, spymeg. :lol:


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PostPosted: 25 Jan 2016, 11:32 
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Scruluce wrote:
spymeg wrote:
sldawgs wrote:
[Moved from the Pissed Off thread]
spymeg wrote:
knarf wrote:
Dawson wrote:
Don't people realise the oscars aren't at fault, it's the fact that there weren't enough decent roles for minority actors.

I agree, but I also saw some statistics about the Academy I didn't know before: 94% white, with a median age of 62*.

Since they select the nominees, there's definitely the potential for bias to have an impact. At the very least it can effect the movies they decide to watch/possibly nominate.



* also 77% male, but that's another issue.

But the Academy doesn't nominate, right? Most categories are nominated by the members of the corresponding branch–actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. Then the members vote on those noms? And the Academy members are all people in the business..actors, writers, etc. ?

Okay according to Mental Floss, this is the way the Academy selects Oscar nominees.
Quote:
THE FORMULA FOR GETTING NOMINATED

The Academy has strict rules that determine what people or films can be nominated. In order to submit a film for nomination, a movie's producer or distributor must sign and submit an “Official Screen Credits” in early December. That's not just a full list of credits; you need proof that the film meets certain criteria: In order to be eligible, the film must be over 40 minutes in length; must be publicly screened for paid admission in Los Angeles County (with the name of a particular theater where it screened included); and must screen for a qualifying run of at least seven straight days. In addition, the film cannot have its premiere outside of a theatrical run—screening a film for the first time on television or the Internet, for example, renders the film ineligible.

Then, the ballots are sent out. According to Entertainment Weekly, "Voters are asked to list up to five names, ranked in order of preference. The Academy instructs voters to 'follow their hearts' because the voting process doesn’t penalize for picking eccentric choices ... Also, listing the same person or film twice doesn’t help their cause—in fact, it actually diminishes the chance that the voter’s ballot will be counted at all."

Once members send back their ballots, PricewaterhouseCoopers begins the process of crunching the numbers. Specifically, they're looking for the magic number, the amount of votes in each category that automatically turns a potential nominee into an official nominee. To determine the magic number, PwC takes the total number of ballots received for a particular category and divides it by the total possible nominees plus one. An easy example is to take 600 potential ballots for the Best Actor category, divide that by 6 (five possible nominees plus one), thus making the magic number for the category 100 ballots to become an official nominee.

The counting—which is still done by hand—starts based on a voter’s first choice selection until someone reaches the magic number. Say Leonardo DiCaprio reaches the magic number first for his performance in The Revenant: the ballots that named him as a first choice are then all set aside, and there are now four spots left for the Best Actor category. The actor with the fewest first-place votes is automatically knocked out, and those ballots are redistributed based on the voters' second place choices (though the actors still in the running retain their calculated votes from the first round). The counting continues, and actors or different categories rack up redistributed votes until all five spots are filled. According to Entertainment Weekly, "if a ballot runs out of selections, that ballot is voided and is no longer in play, which is why it’s important for voters to list five different nominees." (The magic number drops as ballots are voided, by the way.) The process is ballooned for the Best Picture category, which can have up to 10 nominees and no less than five.

Deciding the winners is much simpler: After the nominees are decided, the whole Academy gets to vote on each category. Each member gets one vote per category—though they're discouraged from voting in categories they don't fully understand or categories in which they haven't seen all the nominated films—and the film or actor with the most votes wins. That process takes PwC just three days.

So how is PwC being mostly white, older men affecting this process? I'm just a little slow. :D

wd, spymeg. :lol:

:green: :lol:

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PostPosted: 26 Jan 2016, 11:48 
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FilmWise's Unshod Avenger
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and now Gandalf joins the fray......oh joy. How long can it be until the actor/actress awards are "gender-neutral". : vomit :

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PostPosted: 26 Jan 2016, 12:20 
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NoShoes wrote:
and now Gandalf joins the fray......oh joy. How long can it be until the actor/actress awards are "gender-neutral". : vomit :


Peter Dinklage needs to find some minority heritage start the trans change and marry a dude then win an Oscar otherwise it's somethingist

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