The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

or: How I learned to stop worrying and love other types of entertainment, too.
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Sela
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#101 Post by Sela » 02 Feb 2010, 14:04

Let’s try this again, shall we?

It’s taken me a long time to be back in my happy place (particularly at work)

Without much ado, let’s get down to business…

E-Commerce

Truly, the advent of e-commerce has revolutionized the world for soundtrack collectors.

Not only you can now find scores from all over the world, via stores and auctions, but now labels and composers themselves have found a direct line to the consumer.

The labels have been able to recover a bunch of unreleased scores and work deals for limited releases; much better for them, with lower fees and pretty much guaranteed sold out editions. And the composers themselves have been releasing some of their works.

The only thing, is that there is a bit of craziness with the limited editions, quickly selling out in some cases, and then fetching exorbitant prices on eBay. So, we have to keep up, with Varese Sarabande, Intrada, La-La-Land records…


Outstanding recent release

Back to the Future(Alan Silvestri – 2 CD Set)
Limited edition of ??? copies

Finally!!! The original release was mainly devoted to the songs, with 2 suites of music. Most collectors have enjoyed the subsequent releases of parts 2 and 3 as a substitute. But nothing like the original.

Here are the release notes from the publisher
Intrada wrote: Wow! At last! Alan Silvestri's complete orchestral soundtrack for legendary Robert Zemeckis movie, released by Universal, produced by Steven Spielberg, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. Spectacular 2-CD set offers every cue Silvestri fashioned for landmark movie, presented from complete multi-track scoring session masters. CD 1 features now-iconic score used in movie. (Songs can be found on MCA label release.) But there's more! Many film fans know movie underwent changes in lead actor & serious tone of initial production. Find out now how Silvestri made changes as well! CD 2 presents early sessions featuring entire score Silvestri recorded before re-scoring with now-familiar one. Early version features darker, more serious tone in music than final version. Cool alternate scoring highlight: powerful trombone chords for initial version of Marty arriving in "Peabody Barn". Another powerful highlight: lengthy, intense action music for "George To The Rescue". Highlighting both discs, of course: early and final versions of complete "Clocktower" sequence, a genuine cinema-scoring milestone. Authoritative notes by Michael Matessino on background of production, scoring details, session dates plus great color stills complete package. Both early version and familiar "famous" version of score offer non-stop excitement! Alan Silvestri conducts. Note: While this is a limited release, we don't want anyone to miss out on this important album. For that reason, we are electing not to specify a quantity, but our Agreement allows us to exceed the usual 3000 limit. There should be more than enough to go around!
Track: It’s been educational/Clocktower


Relevant website

Moviescore Magazine

Mainly devoted to news of the film music industry; I like the clean interface, and the news themselves. Good for a weekly roundup of what’s going on, and who is assigned to different scores



Collectors corner, Must-Have & Small Gems

As the section indicates, here I’ll try to name 3 scores; the first, a difficult to find title, the second, is pretty much given, and the third, is a score that you may not think about that often (mainly due to the quality of the film), but it’s a surprising find.

Collector’s corner: Dragonslayer – Alex North
This academy award nominated score only had 2 editions, both incredibly rare. The editions are actually a mess, if you try to follow the notes with the movie. But it’s still an impressive and somber score, very symphonic. It’s difficult on a first hearing, but I consider it a necessity.
Track: Elspeth's Destiny; Dragon Scales

Must-Have: Up – Michael Giacchino
Giacchino is without a doubt one of the best composers on the field today. From all his exceptional work for different video games, to being JJ Abrams go-to guy, and then demonstrating his exceptional qualities with Pixar films. And for this title, he managed to add the same value that the movie has. Heart.

Track: Carl goes up

Small Gems: Cruel Intentions – John Ottman
A very interesting release, not only for a very simplistic score, that also showcases other works from the composer, including themes and suites for titles like Halloween H20, Lake Placid or Incognito; and always showcasing on each one how clearly he understands the main theme of the films.
Tracks: Jealousy / Incognito Theme


Trivia

Alex North was commissioned by Stanley Kubrick to write the score for “2001: A Space Odyssey”. But he was devastated when he discovered at the 1968 New York City premiere screening that his score had been replaced.
Since then, it has been released twice (the first after insistence from his friend Jerry Goldsmith, who re-recorded it); among scholars, there are those who even argue that the film would be even better, had the music not being replaced
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#102 Post by Agrajag » 06 Feb 2010, 11:47

Sela5 wrote:Let’s try this again, shall we?
It's good to have you back Sela!

And now I'm $30-some poorer because of that BTTF soundtrack :-)
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#103 Post by Egbert Souse » 07 Feb 2010, 09:16

Looking forward to more postings from you, Sela.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#104 Post by Agrajag » 07 Mar 2010, 20:48

Love that the Best Score nominees got their work played on the Oscars tonight...

Dancing was good, but hearing the scores was better...

Really wanted Fantastic Mr. Fox to win, but Up was a pretty decent score too
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#105 Post by Sela » 07 Mar 2010, 21:05

Agrajag wrote:Love that the Best Score nominees got their work played on the Oscars tonight...

Dancing was good, but hearing the scores was better...

Really wanted Fantastic Mr. Fox to win, but Up was a pretty decent score too
I was rooting for Up. I though it was a fantastic score. Couldn't stand the stupid interpretive dance...
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#106 Post by Agrajag » 07 Mar 2010, 21:15

Sela wrote:
Agrajag wrote:Love that the Best Score nominees got their work played on the Oscars tonight...

Dancing was good, but hearing the scores was better...

Really wanted Fantastic Mr. Fox to win, but Up was a pretty decent score too
I was rooting for Up. I though it was a fantastic score. Couldn't stand the stupid interpretive dance...
Haven't heard either score in its entirety (other than the actual movie) but the songs I've heard from each film--I liked FMF more.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#107 Post by Egbert Souse » 08 Mar 2010, 14:15

I, too liked hearing the scores. I definitely did not like the dancing that went along with it. I think this is the first year that I can remember that they didn't play the nominated songs. I can't say I missed that.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#108 Post by Steel Frog » 08 Mar 2010, 19:08

Egbert Souse wrote:I, too liked hearing the scores. I definitely did not like the dancing that went along with it. I think this is the first year that I can remember that they didn't play the nominated songs. I can't say I missed that.
At the point of the awkward dancing, I said "this is awful" and my wife commented, "beats that time they all danced to an editing montage."

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#109 Post by Sela » 30 Mar 2010, 07:27

Ok, work continues to be super crazy; but I'm pretty sure I'll be able to post something new next week.

FYI, I have ideas for a few of the next posts, dedicating some to classic Musicals, some older stuff, some TV scores, a few requests....
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#110 Post by Middle » 01 Apr 2010, 03:51

Found this (somewhat) interesting piece on IMDb's front page:
IFC wrote:The punishing action score
Friday sees the release of the revamped "Clash of the Titans," the trailer for which has to set come kind of record for the most joyless combination of grim faces, heinously ugly monsters and nu-metal roar. It's all very murky and loud, but mostly it seems like no fun: like the roar of Nickelback magnified with some industrial drums, capped off by the inevitable release of the Kraken, whose hoarse bellow would do Eddie Vedder proud.

When did action scores becomes so industrial? If you're not one of those people who agonizes over the moral problems of killing people on-screen for sport -- and really, get over it -- there's no reason that action movies should be so monochromatic and trudging. And yet watching the "Clash of the Titans" trailer is like nothing so much as listening to alt-radio from a decade back. You half expect the Kraken to begin wailing about its issues with its father.

The music is courtesy of Ramin Djawadi, who does this kind of thing all the time: witness, say, his theme for "Iron Man," which starts out as nothing and then eventually becomes a bunch of guitars and fake drums, which is really just a higher budget version of the on-the-cheap "Prison Break" music he also did.

It's all in keeping with how lousy a lot of contemporary action scores are -- they make what should be fun a trudge. (Last year's "Armored" is an okay movie, but John Murphy's score sounds like straight-up nu-metal.) Part of the problem is the death of the full-orchestra score, which now sounds anachronistic to most -- listening to, say, the climactic battle music from "Die Hard" isn't necessarily more fun, but all the instruments give you more room to breathe. The limited range of sounds generally tapped now -- basically an augmented band with strings -- can get claustrophobic.

Instead of blaming radio or declining budgets for music, it might be wisest to blame Clint Mansell's theme for "Requiem For A Dream," one of the most ubiquitous trailer backdrops. It's still a cool theme -- rising minimalism as frenzy -- but everyone seems to have learned the wrong lessons: stay grim, stay in a minimal range, and you too can prosper. No one really wants to hear peppy, upbeat full-orchestra stuff like "Independence Day" (too peppy, too martial), but surely there's a path somewhere between the "Indiana Jones" theme and utter despair.
What's your take on this? Do you see a current trend/shift toward 'generic' soundtracks?
Granted, Requiem for a Dream's theme is heavily overused, but it's still an orchestrated tune. I don't really see the parallel to the nu-metal scores.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#111 Post by Sela » 01 Apr 2010, 09:27

Middle wrote:Found this (somewhat) interesting piece on IMDb's front page:
IFC wrote:The punishing action score
Friday sees the release of the revamped "Clash of the Titans," the trailer for which has to set come kind of record for the most joyless combination of grim faces, heinously ugly monsters and nu-metal roar. It's all very murky and loud, but mostly it seems like no fun: like the roar of Nickelback magnified with some industrial drums, capped off by the inevitable release of the Kraken, whose hoarse bellow would do Eddie Vedder proud.

When did action scores becomes so industrial? If you're not one of those people who agonizes over the moral problems of killing people on-screen for sport -- and really, get over it -- there's no reason that action movies should be so monochromatic and trudging. And yet watching the "Clash of the Titans" trailer is like nothing so much as listening to alt-radio from a decade back. You half expect the Kraken to begin wailing about its issues with its father.

The music is courtesy of Ramin Djawadi, who does this kind of thing all the time: witness, say, his theme for "Iron Man," which starts out as nothing and then eventually becomes a bunch of guitars and fake drums, which is really just a higher budget version of the on-the-cheap "Prison Break" music he also did.

It's all in keeping with how lousy a lot of contemporary action scores are -- they make what should be fun a trudge. (Last year's "Armored" is an okay movie, but John Murphy's score sounds like straight-up nu-metal.) Part of the problem is the death of the full-orchestra score, which now sounds anachronistic to most -- listening to, say, the climactic battle music from "Die Hard" isn't necessarily more fun, but all the instruments give you more room to breathe. The limited range of sounds generally tapped now -- basically an augmented band with strings -- can get claustrophobic.

Instead of blaming radio or declining budgets for music, it might be wisest to blame Clint Mansell's theme for "Requiem For A Dream," one of the most ubiquitous trailer backdrops. It's still a cool theme -- rising minimalism as frenzy -- but everyone seems to have learned the wrong lessons: stay grim, stay in a minimal range, and you too can prosper. No one really wants to hear peppy, upbeat full-orchestra stuff like "Independence Day" (too peppy, too martial), but surely there's a path somewhere between the "Indiana Jones" theme and utter despair.
What's your take on this? Do you see a current trend/shift toward 'generic' soundtracks?
Granted, Requiem for a Dream's theme is heavily overused, but it's still an orchestrated tune. I don't really see the parallel to the nu-metal scores.
I don't agree much with the article. While its true that a certain minimalistic approach is currently obvious, particularly in action scores (and most of the blame falls on Hans Zimmer and his minions army...), there is plenty of full orchestral scores out there.

Sure, not all movies have the budget to employ a full orchestra (And those costs are high...), but many composers know this and work around it in very creative ways, adding new and exotic sounds and instruments to keep things going, for example.

And please, you can't blame Clint Mansell. Sure, Requiem for a Dream is a minimalistic score, but what we hear on trailers more often is Requiem for a Tower: Movement IV, which is a version of the Requiem for a Dream theme....but with a full orchestra.

For every nu-metal trailer that this guy can point out, I can pass you a fully orchestral action score. Or a mix of both things, like Transformers
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#112 Post by » 02 Apr 2010, 00:10

I loved the score for How to Train a Dragon. I thought it did a great job of enhancing the action.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#113 Post by Steel Frog » 03 Apr 2010, 21:25

Middle wrote:
IFC wrote:...Last year's "Armored" is an okay movie...
What's your take on this?
It lost me at "okay". Armored sucked ass.

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#114 Post by alan smithee » 04 Apr 2010, 12:16

Steel Frog wrote:
Middle wrote:
IFC wrote:...Last year's "Armored" is an okay movie...
What's your take on this?
It lost me at "okay". Armored sucked ass.
:lol:
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#115 Post by Middle » 06 Apr 2010, 00:08

alan smithee wrote:
Steel Frog wrote:
Middle wrote:
IFC wrote:...Last year's "Armored" is an okay movie...
What's your take on this?
It lost me at "okay". Armored sucked ass.
:lol:
:lol:
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#116 Post by Middle » 19 Apr 2010, 12:59

Maybe it was a budget thing, but half of the instrumental score of Kick-Ass was recyled from other movies. Most of them were John Murphy scores from Danny Boyle movies (from 28 Days Later and Sunshine). I can't remember seeing movies where they actually played music I recognized coming from other movies. Does this happen often on wide releases?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#117 Post by Sela » 19 Apr 2010, 13:09

Middle wrote:Maybe it was a budget thing, but half of the instrumental score of Kick-Ass was recyled from other movies. Most of them were John Murphy scores from Danny Boyle movies (from 28 Days Later and Sunshine). I can't remember seeing movies where they actually played music I recognized coming from other movies. Does this happen often on wide releases?
Occasionally. I remember a few examples here and there, although mostly is just a few simple themes.

One big example comes from Spider-Man 2, where Sam Raimi asked Danny Elfman repeatedly to have a certain scene scored, to sound similar to a piece from a Christopher Young's score (Defcon-4 I believe); after repeated tries and rejections, Elfman told Raimi to just simply play that specific music.

And perhaps, a very clear example can be heard on Scream where "Dewey's theme" is actually the main theme from Broken Arrow
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#118 Post by Middle » 19 Apr 2010, 13:32

Speaking of which, has that 28 Days Later theme (In the House - In a Heartbeat) been used in any trailers? I recall it being in some, but can't remember what.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#119 Post by Sela » 19 Apr 2010, 19:22

Middle wrote:Speaking of which, has that 28 Days Later theme (In the House - In a Heartbeat) been used in any trailers? I recall it being in some, but can't remember what.
I remember it in Beowulf for sure, but I can see from wikipedia that it has been heavily featured on TV
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#120 Post by alan smithee » 22 Apr 2010, 02:21

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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#121 Post by Middle » 22 Apr 2010, 04:20

alan smithee wrote:[img]...[/img]
Yeah, that's a nice touch.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#122 Post by Agrajag » 31 May 2010, 20:40

OK.. so what is the name of the track that played
Spoiler for
every time someone in LAX-purgatory remembered the island?
This site was no help (unless I don't know how to use it, which is quite possible). I love the song—I figure it may be on each season's soundtrack, or this might just be a variation of a theme (sounds familiar) but I really want to find just this track by itself...

Any help?
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#123 Post by Dawson » 04 Jul 2010, 23:16

Just found out the guy who did the music on american Ninja 3 also did the Austen Powers music... George S Clinton is my new Music superhero...wait, scratch that, he also did Big Mommas House
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#124 Post by Jimothy » 05 Jul 2010, 16:55

Agrajag wrote:OK.. so what is the name of the track that played
Spoiler for
every time someone in LAX-purgatory remembered the island?
This site was no help (unless I don't know how to use it, which is quite possible). I love the song—I figure it may be on each season's soundtrack, or this might just be a variation of a theme (sounds familiar) but I really want to find just this track by itself...

Any help?
This has all of the music cues from the finale, but it seems like each person/set of people had a specific theme. They may all sound similar though.
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Re: The Tuesday Night Film Music Club

#125 Post by Agrajag » 05 Jul 2010, 17:48

Jimothy wrote:
Agrajag wrote:OK.. so what is the name of the track that played
Spoiler for
every time someone in LAX-purgatory remembered the island?
This site was no help (unless I don't know how to use it, which is quite possible). I love the song—I figure it may be on each season's soundtrack, or this might just be a variation of a theme (sounds familiar) but I really want to find just this track by itself...

Any help?
This has all of the music cues from the finale, but it seems like each person/set of people had a specific theme. They may all sound similar though.
Seems to be a variation of "Life and Death," possibly "There's No Place Like Home" but it's hard to tell from 30 second clips.

Thanks for the help!
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