Cricket

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#26 Post by Fat Head » 04 Aug 2006, 02:51

Here is an overview on the rules that should clear it all up

You have two sides, one out on the field and the other in.

Each man in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in, and the next man goes out till he's out.

When the side that's in is all out, the side that been out comes in and the side that been in goes out and tries to get out the side that's coming in.

Sometimes you get men still in and not out when the side that is in is finally out. When both sides have been in and out, including those who are in and not out, that's the end of the game.

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#27 Post by Humphrey » 04 Aug 2006, 02:54

for those interested, there is live ball-by-ball coverage of the third test match between England and Pakistan. England are off to a cracking start, but will no doubt start losing wickets now that I jinxed them.
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#28 Post by Humphrey » 04 Aug 2006, 02:55

Fat Head wrote:Here is an overview on the rules that should clear it all up

You have two sides, one out on the field and the other in.

Each man in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in, and the next man goes out till he's out.

When the side that's in is all out, the side that been out comes in and the side that been in goes out and tries to get out the side that's coming in.

Sometimes you get men still in and not out when the side that is in is finally out. When both sides have been in and out, including those who are in and not out, that's the end of the game.

wd, that sums it up nicely
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#29 Post by Agrajag » 04 Aug 2006, 14:08

Fat Head wrote:Here is an overview on the rules that should clear it all up

You have two sides, one out on the field and the other in.

Each man in the side that's in goes out, and when he's out he comes in, and the next man goes out till he's out.

When the side that's in is all out, the side that been out comes in and the side that been in goes out and tries to get out the side that's coming in.

Sometimes you get men still in and not out when the side that is in is finally out. When both sides have been in and out, including those who are in and not out, that's the end of the game.

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#30 Post by Hiller » 09 Aug 2006, 08:02

http://www.cricinfo.com/link_to_databas ... RICAN.html

This is pretty long, but was very helpful in understanding the game better. When do we start the fantasy cricket league?
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#31 Post by Humphrey » 10 Aug 2006, 02:37

A fantasy cricket league would not be a bad idea. Perhaps we could set one up for the Ashes in the winter. (The domestic cricket championships run between May and Septemberish, so we are far too late for that now.)
In the meantime, try the game on this site: http://www.stickcricket.com
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#32 Post by Hiller » 10 Aug 2006, 08:23

Humphrey wrote:A fantasy cricket league would not be a bad idea. Perhaps we could set one up for the Ashes in the winter. (The domestic cricket championships run between May and Septemberish, so we are far too late for that now.)
In the meantime, try the game on this site: http://www.stickcricket.com


That actually helped a little to see how the game works. When does EASports release Cricket 2006?

On one bowl (if that is how you phrase it) my guy missed and got hit in the head and the fell over and knocked down the wicket and was out. Is that legal? Does it happen often?
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#33 Post by sldawgs » 10 Aug 2006, 08:45

Hiller wrote:On one bowl (if that is how you phrase it) my guy missed and got hit in the head and the fell over and knocked down the wicket and was out. Is that legal? Does it happen often?

Oh man, If Baseball had that it would make it so much more fun to watch!

BTW nobody ever answered me if "Sticky Wicket" is a Cricket slang term.
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#34 Post by Hiller » 10 Aug 2006, 09:18

wicket

• noun 1 Cricket each of the sets of three stumps with two bails across the top at either end of the pitch, defended by a batsman. 2 a small door or gate, especially one beside or in a larger one.

— PHRASES at the wicket Cricket 1 batting. 2 by the wicketkeeper. a sticky wicket 1 Cricket a pitch that has been drying after rain and is difficult to bat on. 2 informal a tricky or awkward situation.
— ORIGIN Old French wiket; probably related to an Old Norse word meaning ‘to turn, move’.

I found this.
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#35 Post by sldawgs » 10 Aug 2006, 09:35

Hiller wrote:wicket

• noun 1 Cricket each of the sets of three stumps with two bails across the top at either end of the pitch, defended by a batsman. 2 a small door or gate, especially one beside or in a larger one.

— PHRASES at the wicket Cricket 1 batting. 2 by the wicketkeeper. a sticky wicket 1 Cricket a pitch that has been drying after rain and is difficult to bat on. 2 informal a tricky or awkward situation.
— ORIGIN Old French wiket; probably related to an Old Norse word meaning ‘to turn, move’.

I found this.

Thanks, H :lol:
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#36 Post by DrG » 10 Aug 2006, 09:52

Hiller wrote:
Humphrey wrote:A fantasy cricket league would not be a bad idea. Perhaps we could set one up for the Ashes in the winter. (The domestic cricket championships run between May and Septemberish, so we are far too late for that now.)
In the meantime, try the game on this site: http://www.stickcricket.com


That actually helped a little to see how the game works. When does EASports release Cricket 2006?

On one bowl (if that is how you phrase it) my guy missed and got hit in the head and the fell over and knocked down the wicket and was out. Is that legal? Does it happen often?

I believe this is referred to as "hit wicket", and yes, it is a legal dismissal in cricket (the batsman's aim is to defend his wicket). As far as I know, it's a relatively rare occurrence these days.
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#37 Post by Gren » 10 Aug 2006, 12:05

DrG wrote:
Hiller wrote:
Humphrey wrote:A fantasy cricket league would not be a bad idea. Perhaps we could set one up for the Ashes in the winter. (The domestic cricket championships run between May and Septemberish, so we are far too late for that now.)
In the meantime, try the game on this site: http://www.stickcricket.com

That actually helped a little to see how the game works. When does EASports release Cricket 2006?

On one bowl (if that is how you phrase it) my guy missed and got hit in the head and the fell over and knocked down the wicket and was out. Is that legal? Does it happen often?

I believe this is referred to as "hit wicket", and yes, it is a legal dismissal in cricket (the batsman's aim is to defend his wicket). As far as I know, it's a relatively rare occurrence these days.

Pretty much anything resulting in the batsman hitting the wicket would result in him being given out. The Pakistani captain fell over and landed on his own wicket just the other day and was given out, much to the entertainment of the English fans.

The ball striking the batsman anywhere is allowed, and does quite often happen (hence the majority of players wearing lots of protection these days). As for the bowler deliberately aiming for the batsman; I'm not sure on the legality. There was once a huge issue with 'body-line bowling' that made a lot of people unhappy. It's certainly frowned upon at least.

Oh, and I'm not sure if you were joking or not about the video game. Cricket 2006 isn't out yet, but presumably will be soon.

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#38 Post by Hiller » 10 Aug 2006, 13:09

So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I assumed there was a game somewhere in the world, and I just guessed EA Sports made it. I haven't seen it around here though. I'll keep looking in stores.
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#39 Post by Gren » 10 Aug 2006, 13:13

Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

Hiller wrote:I assumed there was a game somewhere in the world, and I just guessed EA Sports made it. I haven't seen it around here though. I'll keep looking in stores.

Just FYI, depending on where you buy it from, the cover changes. There's at least 3 different versions.
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#40 Post by Philip » 10 Aug 2006, 13:41

Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

It's covered under law 42 (fair and unfair play). If the umpire determines that a bowler is deliberately and dangerously bowling at the batsman, he will call a no-ball and issue a caution. If the bowler persists with dangerous play, the umpire has the power to bar the bowler from bowling again in that inning.

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#41 Post by DrG » 10 Aug 2006, 13:54

Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:I assumed there was a game somewhere in the world, and I just guessed EA Sports made it. I haven't seen it around here though. I'll keep looking in stores.

Just FYI, depending on where you buy it from, the cover changes. There's at least 3 different versions.

I couldn't see the version above being particularly popular in Australia ;)
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#42 Post by Humphrey » 11 Aug 2006, 02:10

Philip wrote:
Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

It's covered under law 42 (fair and unfair play). If the umpire determines that a bowler is deliberately and dangerously bowling at the batsman, he will call a no-ball and issue a caution. If the bowler persists with dangerous play, the umpire has the power to bar the bowler from bowling again in that inning.

In one-day cricket they have a one bouncer per over rule, while in test cricket bowlers will rarely be penalised for bowling bouncers. At least I have never seen it happen. Last summer Freddie Flintoff (that's the guy on the cover of the game above) bowled something like three consecutive bouncers at an Aussie and nearly broke his arm and fingers. In another innings Harmison, I think it was, bowled a bouncer at the Australian captain that hit him on the helmet so hard, that some part of the helmet tore a deep cut into his cheek.
The "bodyline" series was in the early 1930s when the England captain Douglas Jardine came up with the strategy of bowling fast and hard straight at the batsman's body to unsettle them, thereby forcing errors and getting them out more cheaply. It did cause a lot of resentment then, but today aggressive bodyline bowling is the norm for proper fast bowlers (ie not swing or seam bowlers).
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#43 Post by Philip » 11 Aug 2006, 12:46

Humphrey wrote:
Philip wrote:
Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

It's covered under law 42 (fair and unfair play). If the umpire determines that a bowler is deliberately and dangerously bowling at the batsman, he will call a no-ball and issue a caution. If the bowler persists with dangerous play, the umpire has the power to bar the bowler from bowling again in that inning.

In one-day cricket they have a one bouncer per over rule, while in test cricket bowlers will rarely be penalised for bowling bouncers. At least I have never seen it happen.

Per law 42, the umpire must consider the "relative skill" of the batsman and whether he can cope with fast short-pitched deliveries before calling a dangerous bowl. Test match-calibre players, especially top order batsmen, are expected to handle the high ones.

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#44 Post by Agrajag » 12 Aug 2006, 07:36

I've read all of this (thanks all for trying to expalin it to me) and some of it is slowly sinking in.... I think I need to check out BBC America or something to try to record a match and actually see a game. The few times I've seen cricket it's in a movie/TV show so it's editted and I was never able to follow any of it. Maybe seeing an actual game with this small knowledge I've gained will help me understand it a bit more.
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#45 Post by London Redsox » 12 Aug 2006, 14:38

Philip wrote:
Humphrey wrote:
Philip wrote:
Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

It's covered under law 42 (fair and unfair play). If the umpire determines that a bowler is deliberately and dangerously bowling at the batsman, he will call a no-ball and issue a caution. If the bowler persists with dangerous play, the umpire has the power to bar the bowler from bowling again in that inning.

In one-day cricket they have a one bouncer per over rule, while in test cricket bowlers will rarely be penalised for bowling bouncers. At least I have never seen it happen.

Per law 42, the umpire must consider the "relative skill" of the batsman and whether he can cope with fast short-pitched deliveries before calling a dangerous bowl. Test match-calibre players, especially top order batsmen, are expected to handle the high ones.


And the deliveries that are generally outlawed would be the ones that are bowled at head-height without bouncing on the pitch, a 'beamer'.
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#46 Post by DrG » 12 Aug 2006, 16:02

Agrajag wrote:I've read all of this (thanks all for trying to expalin it to me) and some of it is slowly sinking in.... I think I need to check out BBC America or something to try to record a match and actually see a game. The few times I've seen cricket it's in a movie/TV show so it's editted and I was never able to follow any of it. Maybe seeing an actual game with this small knowledge I've gained will help me understand it a bit more.

I actually figured out most of the rules of cricket by watching the 1992 World Cup while off school sick. I hated cricket and found it incredibly dull up until that point. We were lucky enough to have satellite TV then and started watching a game while channel-hopping and happened upon some shots of hott guys :oops:

I can recommend Twenty20 cricket as a good introduction to the sport. It's a relatively new concept over here and it's great fun. One innings of 20 overs per team, and the whole game is usually wrapped up within three hours. Different games have different styles of bowling and fielding, eg Test match cricket is very different to one day matches.

Now you just need to get me into baseball and the ball sport exchange will be complete. Keep watching various games on Five over here, but I still haven't figured out the rules :crazy: :D
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#47 Post by London Redsox » 13 Aug 2006, 12:46

DrG wrote:
Agrajag wrote:I've read all of this (thanks all for trying to expalin it to me) and some of it is slowly sinking in.... I think I need to check out BBC America or something to try to record a match and actually see a game. The few times I've seen cricket it's in a movie/TV show so it's editted and I was never able to follow any of it. Maybe seeing an actual game with this small knowledge I've gained will help me understand it a bit more.

I actually figured out most of the rules of cricket by watching the 1992 World Cup while off school sick. I hated cricket and found it incredibly dull up until that point. We were lucky enough to have satellite TV then and started watching a game while channel-hopping and happened upon some shots of hott guys :oops:

I can recommend Twenty20 cricket as a good introduction to the sport. It's a relatively new concept over here and it's great fun. One innings of 20 overs per team, and the whole game is usually wrapped up within three hours. Different games have different styles of bowling and fielding, eg Test match cricket is very different to one day matches.

Now you just need to get me into baseball and the ball sport exchange will be complete. Keep watching various games on Five over here, but I still haven't figured out the rules :crazy: :D


It's nowhere near as complicated as cricket. If you've mastered that, you should have no trouble. Any specific areas of difficulty?
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#48 Post by Gren » 13 Aug 2006, 13:39

London Redsox wrote:
DrG wrote:
Agrajag wrote:I've read all of this (thanks all for trying to expalin it to me) and some of it is slowly sinking in.... I think I need to check out BBC America or something to try to record a match and actually see a game. The few times I've seen cricket it's in a movie/TV show so it's editted and I was never able to follow any of it. Maybe seeing an actual game with this small knowledge I've gained will help me understand it a bit more.

I actually figured out most of the rules of cricket by watching the 1992 World Cup while off school sick. I hated cricket and found it incredibly dull up until that point. We were lucky enough to have satellite TV then and started watching a game while channel-hopping and happened upon some shots of hott guys :oops:

I can recommend Twenty20 cricket as a good introduction to the sport. It's a relatively new concept over here and it's great fun. One innings of 20 overs per team, and the whole game is usually wrapped up within three hours. Different games have different styles of bowling and fielding, eg Test match cricket is very different to one day matches.

Now you just need to get me into baseball and the ball sport exchange will be complete. Keep watching various games on Five over here, but I still haven't figured out the rules :crazy: :D


It's nowhere near as complicated as cricket. If you've mastered that, you should have no trouble. Any specific areas of difficulty?

Staying awake
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#49 Post by DrG » 13 Aug 2006, 14:12

Gren wrote:
London Redsox wrote:
DrG wrote:
Agrajag wrote:I've read all of this (thanks all for trying to expalin it to me) and some of it is slowly sinking in.... I think I need to check out BBC America or something to try to record a match and actually see a game. The few times I've seen cricket it's in a movie/TV show so it's editted and I was never able to follow any of it. Maybe seeing an actual game with this small knowledge I've gained will help me understand it a bit more.

I actually figured out most of the rules of cricket by watching the 1992 World Cup while off school sick. I hated cricket and found it incredibly dull up until that point. We were lucky enough to have satellite TV then and started watching a game while channel-hopping and happened upon some shots of hott guys :oops:

I can recommend Twenty20 cricket as a good introduction to the sport. It's a relatively new concept over here and it's great fun. One innings of 20 overs per team, and the whole game is usually wrapped up within three hours. Different games have different styles of bowling and fielding, eg Test match cricket is very different to one day matches.

Now you just need to get me into baseball and the ball sport exchange will be complete. Keep watching various games on Five over here, but I still haven't figured out the rules :crazy: :D


It's nowhere near as complicated as cricket. If you've mastered that, you should have no trouble. Any specific areas of difficulty?

Staying awake

:lol:

Well, yeah, but that's cos it's on after midnight!

Think the main area I get confused with is all the differing innings, or whatever they are called. Do they have like ten or something innings for each team?
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#50 Post by Philip » 13 Aug 2006, 15:50

London Redsox wrote:
Philip wrote:
Humphrey wrote:
Philip wrote:
Gren wrote:
Hiller wrote:So you could intentionally hit the batsman with out penalty (other then the ball getting away and possibly scoring a run) as many times as you want?

I'm not sure. There may be a specific rule to outlaw it, but I'm not sure of any part of the other rules that would prevent it (not like walking in baseball).

It's covered under law 42 (fair and unfair play). If the umpire determines that a bowler is deliberately and dangerously bowling at the batsman, he will call a no-ball and issue a caution. If the bowler persists with dangerous play, the umpire has the power to bar the bowler from bowling again in that inning.

In one-day cricket they have a one bouncer per over rule, while in test cricket bowlers will rarely be penalised for bowling bouncers. At least I have never seen it happen.

Per law 42, the umpire must consider the "relative skill" of the batsman and whether he can cope with fast short-pitched deliveries before calling a dangerous bowl. Test match-calibre players, especially top order batsmen, are expected to handle the high ones.


And the deliveries that are generally outlawed would be the ones that are bowled at head-height without bouncing on the pitch, a 'beamer'.


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